Tag Archives: Kyogen

Symposium and Performance Demonstration Interactive Interplay: Waki and Ai-Kyōgen Roles in Noh

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JPARC – Japanese Performing Arts Resource Center Lecture Series
ARC – Art Research Center, Ritsumeikan University

Symposium and Performance Demonstration
Interactive Interplay: Waki and Ai-Kyōgen Roles in Noh

Date November 17, 2015 15:00-20:00
Place: Ritsumeikan University, Kinugasa Campus. Art Research Center. Multipurpose room.。


This event consists of two parts. The afternoon symposium (in English with discussion in Japanese) will address the importance of waki and ai-kyōgen roles in late-Muromachi period noh with reference to building an interactive text of the play Funa Benkei for the JPARC database. In the evening demonstration (in Japanese), kyōgen and waki actors will discuss their roles in Funa Benkei, and perform portions of the play.

Symposium  15:00-17:30
15:00 Opening
15:20 Presentation (in English): ” Important auxiliary characters – the case of Funa Benkei and late Muromachi noh plays” by Dr. Lim Beng Choo, National University of Singapore
15:50 Presentation (in English): “The sonic comic: How kyōgen actors create a scenic soundscape” by Dr. Jonah Salz, Ryukoku University
16:30 Break
16:50 Presentation (in English): “Traditional Japanese Theater Websites and the Aims of the JPARC Website” by Dr. Diego Pellecchia
17:10 Round Table Discussion (in Japanese and English) “Purpose, Problems, and Perspectives on Creating Bilingual Interactive Texts, the case of Funa Benkei.” Discussants: Akama Ryō, Diego Pellecchia, Monica Bethe, others
17:40 Break (light refreshments will be provided)
Performance demonstration (in Japanese) 18:30-20:00
“Waki and Kyōgen Players in Late Medieval Noh, the case of Funa Benkei.”
Performers: Izumi Shinya (Kyogen actor, Izumi-ryū)
Arimatsu Ryōichi (Waki actor, Takayasu-ryū)
Oka Mitsuru (Waki actor, Takayasu-ryū)
Introductions: Diego Pellecchia

Sign language Kyogen

Screen shot 2014-01-10 at 10.11.51Quick link. Tokyo-based theatre group Japanese Theatre of the Deaf (also on Facebook) performs traditional Kyogen in sign language (shuwa 手話in Japanese). Following up their recent performances in London BBC reporter joins one of their workshops in sign-language traditional comedy. Unfortunately the video only works for those in the UK. I have only recently found out about this company, and their work looks amazing. I am looking forward to learning more about their activities, and how they contribute to spreading traditional performance in areas other genres have trouble reaching.

Japan (as the UK as far as I know) is particularly active in spreading the culture of sign language. Signed news are broadcasted on a daily basis, and I am a fan of minna no shuwa, the sign language course on the national TV educational channel, NHK t-テレ , broadcasted on Sunday evenings. Japanese Theatre of the Deaf also offers multi-level sign language classes.